Request More Information

x

Overview

The world-renowned Kruger National Park was established in 1898 to conserve the wildlife and natural environment of this unique region. The park is more than 350km long and 90km at its widest, covering more than 2 million hectares or 19 000 km².
Where is the Kruger National Park lodges? Located in the North-eastern corner of South Africa, with Zimbabwe bordering to the north and Mozambique on the Eastern perimeter.

This spectacular ecology supports 147 species of mammals, with 507 species of birds and 33 species of amphibians, making the park a diverse and spectacular sanctuary for South African wildlife.

When to visit the Kruger National Park Lodges? Daytime temperatures are high during summer months, frequently reaching on average well over 30° C. The rainy season normally commences in September to February, turning the dry bushveld into a beautiful lush environment with many bird species migrating back to their summer homes and many game species bearing their young.
During the winter months the days are mild with an average temperature of 23° C. During the dry months the many rivers and waterholes dry up, forcing the wildlife to congregate around the permanent and larger dams and rivers, offering you a better chance of spotting the various species.

Thornhill Safari Lodge is located a mere 40km from the Kruger Park’s Orpen gate, making it easily accessible to experience the most amazing Southern Africa destination with Thornhill Safari Lodge on one of our many Kruger Park safaris.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The world-renowned Kruger National Park was established in 1898
  • This spectacular ecology supports 147 species of mammals, with 507 species of birds and 33 species of amphibians
  • Thornhill Safari Lodge is located a mere 40km from the Kruger Park’s Orpen gate
  • Daytime temperatures in summer frequently reach well over 30° C
  • Kruger National Park Lodges
tree-divider
Kruger National Park Lodges
tree-divider

History

The Kruger National Park was proclaimed a National Park on the 31 May 1926, merging two Reserves the Sabie in the South and Shingwedzi in the North. The National Park was named after the then President of the Transvaal Republic, whom in 1898 proclaimed the Sabie Game Reserve, foreseeing the need in protecting the wildlife of Southern Africa.
James Stevenson-Hamilton (born in 1867) was a British Major during the Second Boer war he was appointed the first Warden of the Sabie Reserve on the 1 July 1902.

As the public became more aware of conservation in the early 1920’s, an overnight stop was included in a Transvaal rail trip. These early visitors slept on the train as there were no overnight facilities available. As this proved to become more and more popular, the Kruger Park wardens saw an opportunity to encourage visitors to the Park and started to build the infrastructure that would enable them to accommodate tourists and their automobiles. The first motorist entered the Park in 1927 and where charged a fee of £1.

At a time long before this remarkable area was proclaimed a National Park, there where early human settlements in the area. Evidence of early stone and Iron Age settlements where found throughout the park and a number of Tsonga tribes occupied the region during this time.